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20110331
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of his life to creating one of the greatest estates in america. >> one of the most fascinating aspects of vizcaya is that it was built at the end of the world. miami at the time was the end of the world, really. >> well, miami didn't even exist until 1896. so we are talking about 20 years after the end of the frontier. this whole part of the town south of the river was what the indians called "the hammock," which is dense subtropical forest. there were panthers still wandering around in it. and, there was a story where a man got lost in the hammock and died. it was so dense. so he picked out wilderness because he wanted the privacy it would offer him. >> james deering hailed from chicago, at a time when the city was growing out of the ashes from the greatest fire of the 19th century. chicago is where the young deering grew up and was educated, and it is where his father william deering founded the agricultural farm equipment business, deering harvester company. around the turn of the century j.p. morgan brokered a merger between deering harvester and mccormick harvesting machine compan
entitled, "the threat to the next america." it appeared in april 1953. >> farnsworth was interviewed by a woman by the name of elizabeth gordon, who published an article in which she said, "there is a woman being obliged to live in this all-glass house, one room, done by an architect who treats her as if he were a dictator." >> baer: gordon even compared the farnsworth house to the looming threat of communism. >> she said, "if you can do without personal things, you're open for a dictator. if you don't have belongings, you're obviously a communist, right? >> baer: edith may have won the media war, but mies won the lawsuit in 1953. yet he never again saw his creation. before long, the new homeowner started to discover just how famous her house was. edith, she had some privacy issues living in a glass house, didn't she? >> yes, she did. she--she's--the story has it that when she would go out of the bathroom, she'd look out the window, and here's about 25 people aiming their cameras. >> baer: tourists. >> tourists. >> they would climb over the fence. they would come across the river on
. and it was interesting. one of the french critics said, "seems to me that john denver is to america what jacques brel is to us." but he had a very big success and performance with port of amsterdam. >> ♪ in the port of amsterdam, ♪ there's a sailor who sings ♪ of the dreams that he brings ♪ from the wide-open sea. ♪ in the port of amsterdam, ♪ there's a sailor who sleeps ♪ while the riverbank weeps ♪ to the old willow tree. >> john was definitely a showman. and he loved to put on a good concert, and he knew that he could sing his ballads, but he also needed to do his lighthearted, funny songs as well, and he had to have a good mix of them, and the audiences just seemed to just absolutely love that. >> bands are like nothing else in life. where singer-songwriters are concerned, the bonding takes the form of breathing together. the people who are out there with you in front of an audience breathing with you while you are putting your life on the line are like none other. >> my first gig with john was actually the tonight show in about february of 1974, and it was the first time that he
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3